Investing


Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

Forty-two years after he founded Vanguard and nearly two decades after relinquishing the CEO spot the same year he had a heart transplant, Jack Bogle is still as outspoken as ever.

If you are looking for easy answers or reassuring platitudes, do not check in with Jack Bogle, the 88-year-old founder and retired CEO of the world’s largest mutual fund company, Vanguard, which manages $4.5 trillion in assets.

“I seek the truth,” he said. “In my long experience, one thing I know is that truth is elusive.”

And even when it’s painful, he believes in facing up to it.

Forty-two years after he founded Vanguard, and nearly two decades after relinquishing the CEO spot the same year he had a heart transplant, Bogle still keeps up a grueling schedule.

This fall he released the 10th edition of one of his best-selling books, The Little Book of Common Sense Investing. In a few weeks he is sitting for a Q&A at the Council on Foreign Relations. In early December, Bogle is speaking at the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the accounting-industry watchdog at the center of a brewing controversy over the scant qualifications of the Senate Republican staffer in line to be the new chairman. Bogle has consistently advocated to make the PCOAB a tough regulator.

In an interview with CNBC, he offered a handful of predictions on the global investment market in 2018 and beyond.



Source link

Products You May Like

Articles You May Like

Twitter, Snap will grow at the expense of Facebook, analyst predicts
5 ways to hone retirement plans under new tax regime
Market upheaval widens rift between Wall Street’s sunny and gloomy forecasts
Domino’s Pizza same-store sales miss estimates, sending shares lower
Why investors can’t gauge their own risk tolerance

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *